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Research toolkit

How to use LinkedIn to develop your research profile

We all want our research to make an impact. That’s why we need to actively talk about it! Learn how to elevate your research profile using Linkedin!

Want to know a little know secret about building a successful career, regardless of whether you decide to pursue academic or industrial paths? 

It’s all about building your network of connections and your professional profile. A strong professional and academic network will help you forge long-term collaborations. And this is essential when you want to develop your research portfolio and publish your work. 

Some time ago, I mentioned that social media give you a fantastic platform to increase the visibility and impact of your research.

And this is true. The more people read your work, the more of them you may inspire! 

But what about you? Is it enough just to post your work on any social media and wait for the others to engage with your work? Would this improve your research profile?  

You may see some increase in your visibility by doing just that. I agree. 

However, to become recognised as an expert in your research, you need more than that. And that’s what this article is about. 

I’m going to tell you how you can use LinkedIn to significantly improve your research profile.

50 creative ways to improve your wellbeing in academia

You often hear about well-being. But do you know what well-being definition is? Find out about 50 surprisingly easy ways to improve your well-being now!

When writing academic manuscripts, we need to present novel ideas, thoughts and discoveries.

As researchers and academics, we tend to have rather busy lives. This starts from the very beginning of your PhD programme – you want to push the boundaries of the knowledge so you must work hard and work a lot, right?

But let me ask you the following questions:

How often do you feel overwhelmed?

How often do you feel that your PhD doesn’t have sense?

How often do you take care of your wellbeing?

That’s right, the amount of work you put in doing your PhD can put a lot of stress on your wellbeing. As I discussed before, you can burn out by pushing too hard.

Do you wonder why wellbeing is important? Well, it’s fundamental to your sustainable motivation and work-life balance.

Therefore, here I share 50 ways in which you can improve your wellbeing!

How to avoid plagiarism in your research?

Are you worried that you unintentionally plagiarise someone? Learn about techniques and tools that will help you avoid plagiarism in your research!

When writing academic manuscripts, we need to present novel ideas, thoughts and discoveries.

But to ensure that the readers of your work understand what you’re talking about, you need to provide them with relevant context and background that presents the current state-of-the-art in your field.

From the discussions I had with you, I’ve realised that many of you are worried about plagiarism and want to know how to avoid plagiarism in your writing.

I’ve decided to share some of my thoughts on what you should pay attention to when writing. I trust these will help you to avoid unintentional plagiarism.

where to find motivation to write a phd

How to motivate yourself when writing a research article

Do you hate writing and leave it to the last minute? Read more about efficient ways that will help you stay motivated when writing a research article!

Academic writing is a key skill that we, as academics and researchers, need to have in our skillset to efficiently communicate our research.

It’s one of the fundamental activities you do, regardless of the career stage.

At the early stage of your career, you’ll mostly use academic writing to disseminate your research via research articles in journals and to write your dissertation – the cumulative point of your PhD degree!

At the later stage of your career, you’ll still be writing and editing research articles, and you’ll most likely need to apply for research funding to sustain your research group.

So you see – writing, especially writing research articles, is a crucial skill that you should develop at the early stage of your career to succeed in academia.

Yet, so many of us hate writing.

How to write an outstanding abstract for your research paper?

Did you know that an abstract is the most important part of your research paper? Learn how to write an abstract and increase engagement with your research!

Have you heard that an abstract is one of the most important elements of your research paper?

I want you to remind yourself of the time when you search for papers to support your research. Ask yourself the following question – what information you read first?

Yes, that’s right – you usually decide whether the research paper is useful for your research based on the title and abstract alone.

Only after the abstract catches your interest, you read the full paper.

You can see the abstract of your research paper as an opportunity to showcase the best aspects of your research and encourage your readers to go through the entire article to find out more.

I know we’re usually not taught how to sell and market our work during our PhDs, which is a real shame if you ask me. But it’s something you can learn using the process for developing habits I discussed some time ago.

Essentially the purpose of an abstract is similar to the sales pitch. The abstract is your opportunity to get your readers hooked and convince them that your work is relevant for them.

And remember, depending on the journal or conference, you’ve got about 100-300 words to convey your message!

So how do you write outstanding abstract for research paper?

101 alternative research tools to support your research project

We do not always fully appreciate how powerful the alternative research tools can be.

Do you get annoyed when you have an important task to complete within a tight deadline, but the license of the research tool you need has just expired?

I know that feeling – I have been there myself as student and academic.

I remember like it was yesterday when I received comments on one of the research manuscripts that I produced at the early stage of my PhD. One of the reviewers has asked me to provide an additional set of results.

It seemed straightforward – I thought. After all, I had the process model ready; I just need to run another case study and make sure the results are valid.

But my eagerness was quickly put down when I realised the license to the software I was using had not been extended yet.

9 best research tools to supercharge your writing and data analysis

Writing an academic paper is a combination of art and science. Master it, and you will hold a powerful weapon in your hand that will help you to succeed in your career.

As a research-active academic, research scientist or PhD researcher, you will be expected to write a lot – from research proposals, through reports for funders and sponsors, through our popular research articles.

If you enjoy writing and analysing data, doing research can be heaven!

12 PhD tools to supercharge your literature review

A literature review is an inherent part of each research project. This is because it helps you to understand the relevant background of the broader research area and the associated political, environmental, societal, technological and economic contexts.

Why is literature review important? Do I have to include a literature review in my research proposal? Do I have to do it at the very beginning of the project?

These were the main questions that revolved around my head when I was at the very beginning of my academic career. And it seems that it was not just me asking such questions. I often hear them in discussions with current PhDs and others doing research. 

5 ways to deal with common PhD challenges

Being a PhD candidate isn’t easy. I believe that you can relate to this. Let me assure you – you’re not alone. We all experience similar PhD challenges, ranging from lack of motivation to workaholism.

I’m not saying this to discourage you – don’t get me wrong. Your research can substantially change our understanding of the world we live in or develop innovative solutions that solve the current (and future) challenges we’re facing. Essentially, we’ve got the power to make our world a better place to live!

Regardless of the importance of your research, there’re always distractions and challenges that drain your motivation. And this is fine – as I wrote earlier, it’s not sustainable to succeed all the time.

You need to reduce these as much as you can to drive your research further, develop, prove feasibility and potentially, commercialise new ideas. From my own experience, I’ve realised that there’re several sources of demotivation that can prevent you from reaching your full potential during your PhD.

Here I list the most pressing PhD challenges that may significantly derail your PhD progress. I share my own reflections on how to best avoid these to reach your full potential and stay motivated during PhD.