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101 alternative research tools to support your research project

We do not always fully appreciate how powerful the alternative research tools can be.

Do you get annoyed when you have an important task to complete within a tight deadline, but the license of the research tool you need has just expired?

I know that feeling – I have been there myself as student and academic.

I remember like it was yesterday when I received comments on one of the research manuscripts that I produced at the early stage of my PhD. One of the reviewers has asked me to provide an additional set of results.

It seemed straightforward – I thought. After all, I had the process model ready; I just need to run another case study and make sure the results are valid.

But my eagerness was quickly put down when I realised the license to the software I was using had not been extended yet.

5 tested ideas to disseminate your research and increase research impact

5 tested ideas to disseminate your research and increase research impact

You have just got a paper published in a prestigious journal. That is fantastic news for your academic career!

But what do you do after your paper got published to further disseminate your research?

Relying on the publishers to promote your research can be a risky approach, simply because of the volume of articles they publish every day. If you do not disseminate your research further, the impact of your research may be hindered, and less potential users of your research will be reached.

In my previous article on “publish or perish” culture, I mentioned that some academic papers do not get cited at all. The quality of research plays a crucial role in such an outcome.

However, I do believe that you can ensure your research gets noticed and read by a broader audience if you embed research outreach, dissemination and engagement activities in your day-to-day work.

Publish or Perish

Publish or perish: did we get lost in the pursuit of academic success?

If you are working towards your PhD or are a postdoc, you must have heard the phrase “publish or perish”.

Did you know that it was first used the late 1920s by Clarence Marsh Case (1928)? It was later defined by Professor Logan Wilson in his book The Academic Man: A Study in the Sociology of a Profession:

The prevailing pragmatism forced upon the academic group is that one must write something and get it into print. Situational imperatives dictate a ‘publish or perish’ credo within the ranks” – Professor Logan Wilson.

But you must be wondering what this actually means for your research. I heard this phrase from my colleague at the very beginning of my research project and was not sure what it meant.

Is success in an academic career really dictated on what and how much you publish? Let me share my view.