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Month: June 2020

How to get things done and stay motivated

Do you struggle to get things done and stay motivated in your research career? Learn how to efficiently set goals and reflect on your work!

Staying motivated and productive while working in the research environment can be quite challenging.

This is mostly because as researchers and academics, we’re trusted with a broad range of responsibilities, from doing research and securing funding, through teaching, developing course material to mentoring others. 

And on the top of this, we’ve got to share our research with the world to ensure it reaches beneficiaries that can potentially use it. 

This is a lot! It’s extremely easy to get overwhelmed, especially if you don’t have a specific plan on how you can get things done. 

As a result, you may lose motivation and your drive to pursue your innovative research. Or even worse, you may burn out, as I explained in my previous article on maintaining sustainable motivation.

As academics and researchers, we’ve to deal with rejection and uncertainty. Even if we give our best, things may not always go exactly as we want. 

So how you can ensure you’ll get things done and stay motivated? 

How to deal with negative environment at work

How to deal with a negative environment?

Experienced an unexpected drop in productivity? You’re likely being influenced by a negative environment at work! Learn how to deal with a negative work environment.

We now live in VUCA world, which stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. And this is on top of the uncertainties that you must deal with in your research project. 

With most of you still working from home, it’s more likely that you feel more anxious and frustrated. You may experience these negative feelings in particular if you don’t have enough support from your project team or the communication is poor. 

There’s also a likelihood that the lines between your life and work will become blurred. It’s really tempting to answer this last email at 2am and work through the night to finish your paper, isn’t it? 

Does this sound familiar?

If you felt like this for a long time, you may be surrounded by a negative environment at work. 

101 alternative research tools to support your research project

We do not always fully appreciate how powerful the alternative research tools can be.

Do you get annoyed when you have an important task to complete within a tight deadline, but the license of the research tool you need has just expired?

I know that feeling – I have been there myself as student and academic.

I remember like it was yesterday when I received comments on one of the research manuscripts that I produced at the early stage of my PhD. One of the reviewers has asked me to provide an additional set of results.

It seemed straightforward – I thought. After all, I had the process model ready; I just need to run another case study and make sure the results are valid.

But my eagerness was quickly put down when I realised the license to the software I was using had not been extended yet.

5 tested ideas to disseminate your research and increase research impact

5 tested ideas to disseminate your research and increase research impact

You have just got a paper published in a prestigious journal. That is fantastic news for your academic career!

But what do you do after your paper got published to further disseminate your research?

Relying on the publishers to promote your research can be a risky approach, simply because of the volume of articles they publish every day. If you do not disseminate your research further, the impact of your research may be hindered, and less potential users of your research will be reached.

In my previous article on “publish or perish” culture, I mentioned that some academic papers do not get cited at all. The quality of research plays a crucial role in such an outcome.

However, I do believe that you can ensure your research gets noticed and read by a broader audience if you embed research outreach, dissemination and engagement activities in your day-to-day work.

How to deal with rejection in 5 easy steps

How to deal with rejection in 5 easy steps?

An academic career is an art of dealing with uncertainty and rejection. Would you agree?  

Being a competitive profession, rejection in academia is inevitable. It’s rather brutal as we often identify rejection of our academic work with personal failure.  

To stay motivated and become a successful academic, you need to develop a defence and coping mechanisms to deal with the uncertainty of outcomes and academic rejection.